Author Archives: World Weaver Press

Out now! New Release: The Devil in Midwinter

WDevil in Midwinter, Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver Pressorld Weaver Press is pleased to announce The Devil in Midwinter by Elise Forier Edie, a new paranormal romance novella, and previously featured in A Winter’s Enchantment, is available in trade paperback and ebook today, Tuesday, April 8, 2014.

Praise for The Devil in Midwinter:

The Devil in Midwinter is a beautiful tapestry of myth and legend and love, woven into a small town romance.”
—Amalia Dillin, author of Forged by Fate

“A mash-up of Mexican folklore and the classic Sleeping Beauty, set in the orchards of Washington, The Devil In Midwinter is a stunning romance that put me in mind of the lush works of Charles De Lint.”
—Kristina Wojtaszek, author of Opal

A handsome stranger, a terrifying monster, a boy who burns and burns… Mattawa, Washington, is usually a sleepy orchard town come December, until a murder, sightings of a fantastic beast, and the arrival of a handsome new vintner in town kindle twenty-year-old reporter Esme Ulloa’s curiosity—and maybe her passion as well. But the more she untangles the mystery, the more the world Esme knows unspools, until she finds herself navigating a place she thought existed only in storybooks, where dreams come alive, monsters walk the earth and magic is real. When tragedy strikes close to home, Esme finds she must strike back, matching wits with an ancient demon in a deadly game, where everything she values stands to be lost, including the love of her life.

Read the digital edition exclusively from these retailers:
Amazon | All Romance | Barnes & Noble | Kobo

Read the trade paperback edition from these and other retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-A-Million| Independent Bookstores

Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver PressElise Forier Edie is an author and playwright based in southern California. Recent works include the play “The Pink Unicorn,” which performed at the United Solo Theatre Festival in New York, a short story, “Leonora,” published in Penumbra magazine and several plays, included in the anthology “Original Middle School Scenes and Monologues,” edited by Kent R. Brown. She is a member of the Authors Guild, the Romance Writers of America (RWA) and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She is married to actor Keith Edie. When she is not writing, she likes to make quilts and soup, but rarely at the same time.

Weredog Weekend

WEREDOG-cover---ebookToday is your last chance to get The Weredog Whisperer by Susan Abel Sullivan as a free Kindle book on Amazon.

Get the book that everyone loves – Praise for The Weredog Whisperer:

 

“Fun, quirky, suspenseful, and outrageous — this paranormal adventure will have you laughing, gasping, and turning the pages.”
—Jeanne Cavelos, best-selling author of The Passing of the Techno-Mages

“If The Weredog Whisperer doesn’t have you busting a gut then your sense of humor has definitely gone… well, you know the rest.”
Scott Barnes, NewMyths.com

“The Weredog Whisperer is LOL funny… Whether readers are from the southside of Dee-troit or south of the Mississippi, Sullivan’s true Southern humor and charm are sure to appeal to them all.”
—Michelle Lowery Combs, award-winning author of Heir to the Lamp and the forthcoming Solomon’s Bell

“Cleo Tidwell’s wacky adventures rank right up there with Stephanie Plum’s and Sookie Stackhouse’s; what fun to enter the world of author Susan Abel Sullivan’s novels!”
—Barbara Rowell, Director Jacksonville (AL) Public Library

“Even better than the first! The Weredog Whisperer puts Cleo Tidwell firmly on my must-read-her-next-adventure list.”
Jeep Diva Reviews

The Weredog Whisperer is a delightful, fun-filled fantasy! Engaging, humorous, and full of surprises.”
—Beth Duke, Author of Delaney’s People and Don’t Shoot Your Mule

The Devil in Midwinter Cover Unveiling

The Devil in Midwinter cover art has arrived! A “new adult” paranormal romance by Elise Forier Edie. And better yet, it’ll be available to read just next week!

Devil in Midwinter, Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver Press

Publication: April 8, 2014.

A handsome stranger, a terrifying monster, a boy who burns and burns…

Mattawa, Washington, is usually a sleepy orchard town come December, until a murder, sightings of a fantastic beast, and the arrival of a handsome new vintner in town kindle twenty-year-old reporter Esme Ulloa’s curiosity—and maybe her passion as well. But the more she untangles the mystery, the more the world Esme knows unspools, until she finds herself navigating a place she thought existed only in storybooks, where dreams come alive, monsters walk the earth and magic is real. When tragedy strikes close to home, Esme finds she must strike back, matching wits with an ancient demon in a deadly game, where everything she values stands to be lost, including the love of her life.

  • Genre: New Adult Paranormal / New Adult Romance
  • Length: Novella, 40,000 words; approx. 200 pages
  • ISBN-13 (trade paperback):  978-0615990002
  • Trade paperback $9.95 / eBook $4.99

Bloggers! Sign up now to be part of The Devil in Midwinter Cover Feature BLITZ, April 14-18. Once you sign up, we’ll send you clean HTML to run on your blog during the blitz including a book/giftcard giveaway for your readers in addition to a separate book/giftcard giveaway for hosts. Sign up here (form at bottom of page along with more details).

Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver PressElise Forier Edie is an author and playwright based in southern California. Recent works include the play “The Pink Unicorn,” which performed at the United Solo Theatre Festival in New York, a short story, “Leonora,” published in Penumbra magazine and several plays, included in the anthology “Original Middle School Scenes and Monologues,” edited by Kent R. Brown. She is a member of the Authors Guild, the Romance Writers of America (RWA) and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She is married to actor Keith Edie. When she is not writing, she likes to make quilts and soup, but rarely at the same time.

 

GLAMOUR Blog Tour – Week One

GLAMOUR blog tour

Check out these Glamour Blog Tour stops from week one of the official tour!

Pre-release Cover Art Discussion All Things Urban Fantasy

March 18th
Night Owl Reviews  **on-going giveaway**
#SFFlunch Twitter chat with Andrea Janes
VampChix & Bite Club
 Escape by Fiction

March 19th
Larkin’s Book Bloggers School kids interview Andrea Janes
Obsession with Books

March 20th
Fade Into Fantasy Interview

March 21st
Ketch’s Book Nook Interview

March 23rd
Better Read Than Dead Interview and **Giveaway**

March 24th
Chapter by Chapter Top Faves

And more stops to come through the end of March!

Out now! New Release: Glamour

Glamour, a novel by Andrea Janes, World Weaver PressWorld Weaver Press (Eileen Wiedbrauk, Editor-in-Chief) is pleased to announce Glamour by Andrea Janes, a new paranormal YA novel, is available in trade paperback and ebook today, Tuesday, March 18, 2014.

Stealing the life she’s always wanted is as easy as casting a spell.

Townie. That’s what eighteen-year-old Christina Sundy is. All year round she lives in a one-stoplight town on Cape Cod and when summer comes she spends her days scooping ice cream for rich tourists, who she hates. So when one of them takes a job in the ice cream shop alongside her, she’s pissed. Why does a blonde and perky Harvard-bound rich girl like Reese Manning want to scoop ice cream anyway?

Something else weird is happening to Christina: tiny blue sparks seem to be shooting off her fingers. It isn’t long before she realizes the truth about herself — she’s actually a powerful hereditary witch. But her newfound powers are too intense for her to handle and, in a moment of rage, she accidentally zaps Reese into another dimension.

So that no one will notice that the rich girl has disappeared, Christina casts a disguising spell, or “glamour,” and lives Reese’s life while she tries to find a retrieval spell.But as the retrieval spell proves harder than anticipated, and as she goes about living Reese’s life without anyone on the outside noticing the switch, Christina realizes that there’s nothing to stop her from making the glamour permanent… except, of course, her fellow witches, a 16th century demon, and, just maybe, her own conscience.

Praise for Glamour

Glamour is pure fun! Characters crackle with humor and unexpected adventure, compel with heart and interest, and live off the page in a delightfully witchy world.”
— Leanna Renee Hieber, bestselling author of the Strangely Beautiful saga

“An exciting and fast paced story, with a wicked-witted heroine that’s simply quite adorable.”
— Katie M John, author of The Knight Trilogy

“Filled with magic and sharp wit. I can’t wait to see what Andrea Janes brings us next!”
— Rebecca Roland, author of Shards of History

Read the digital edition exclusively from these retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | OmniLit

Read the trade paperback from these and other retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-A-Million | Independent Bookstores

Andrea Janes, World Weaver PressAndrea Janes writes horror, dark comedy, thrillers, and historical slapstick. She is the author of Boroughs of the Dead: New York City Ghost Stories. She is also a licensed NYC tour guide, and offers a variety of ghostly tours around the city. Her many obsessions include New York City history, old photographs, Mabel Normand, all things nautical, and beer. She maintains a personal blog over at Spinster Aunt, where she discusses these obsessions in more detail than is probably healthy.

February Query Stats

Our first open query period of 2014 is over and the numbers are (mostly) in. Below are some of our submission stats. Clarity in a query letter is paramount, for the simple reason that we’re much more likely to be interested if we can quickly understand what you’re talking about. It was also quite tickling anytime an author belted out a description of their genre and market — YA contemporary fantasy – that let us know they’d researched and taught themselves what the heck those words meant.

Further, I love writers who know the difference between a dash and an em dash. Editors shall grant you a special place in heaven for exercising that knowledge.

If I had to boil it down, I’d say that sample pages drew me in for their voice, clarity of prose, and quickly established tension. Many sample pages did not have a hook at their opening, or they had a hook but the tension dissipated as soon as the hook ended.

We’ve been vocal about seeking more science fiction and more romance (within all speculative fiction genres), but neither was enough to tip the scales into a request. Nothing is an “automatic request” nor an “automatic rejection.”

Of course, “the thing” that makes us decline a query or request more pages is far more difficult to describe than anything that can be quantified on this page.

Queries received in total: 64
Length of query period: 28 days
Received after close of period: 1
Received via Facebook  (where we don’t accept queries): 1

Note: Not all of these number sets add up to 64. This is because sometimes a manuscript fits in multiple categories, or because it didn’t provide info for a particular data set, or because we screwed up the tally somewhere along the way. Please don’t get too nit-picky about the numbers; we’re word people, not statisticians. Although we did love watching Numb3rs on TV.

Gender of writers submitting queries (as best we could tell by their names and occasionally by the pictures accompanying their email addresses).

  • Male: 27
  • Female: 31
  • Unknown: 5
  • Duo of writers: 1

Sub-genre of Speculative Fiction

  • Science Fiction: 16
  • Fantasy: 45
    • Primary-world fantasy (e.g. contemporary fantasy, alternate history, urban fantasy): 26
    • Second-world fantasy (e.g. high fantasy): 12
    • Dimension hopping (e.g. portals between primary-world and second-world): 6
  • Science-Fantasy: 1
  • Sub-genres we don’t publish (e.g. surrealism, psychological horror, ghost novellas/novels): 5

Other Elements (as described by authors in the query letters).

  • Fairy tale / retellings: 2
  • Paranormal: 8
  • Romance or romantic elements: 9

Form

  • Novel: 56
  • Novella: 6
  • Collection: 2
  • Anthology proposal: 2

Heavyweights and Lightweights. The sweet spot for a first novel is 70,000-90,000 words, generally speaking. Speculative fiction often opens that range up to 70,000-110,000 words. At World Weaver Press we also accept novella submissions. According to SFWA, a novella ends at 40,000 words, at which point it becomes a novel. But that area of 40,000-60,000 words is still a gray area in terms of how the story reads. Is it a fully satisfying novel, or is it a lengthy short? The feel becomes very important in these lightweight situations. On the far end of the spectrum, anything over 110,000 words really tips the scales for us. We start wondering how we can modify our usual print format to accommodate the heavyweight novel without pushing the paperback price-point beyond a reasonable place.

  • Lightweights: 11 (43,000, 44,000, 55,000, 56,000, 58,000, 60,000, 60,000, 61,000, 63,000, 64,000, 66,000)
  • Heavyweights: 5 (120,000, 138,000, 140,000, 162,000, 192,000)
  • No weight (queries that forgot to mention how long the manuscript was): 3

Storytelling choices. Mainly I collected this data to affirm to myself that present tense story telling was not prevalent. It’s a storytelling choice that can frequently backfire, making itself more conspicuous than useful. Whenever I notice it, I cringe. Which isn’t to say that it can’t be pulled off in an interesting, useful, completely appropriate way, like Michelle Lowery Combs did in Heir to the Lamp. But it’s a challenge. I won’t say that a query that comes into my inbox in the present tense has “a strike against it,” but it’s certainly batting with a handicap.

  • First-person present tense: 6
  • Third-person present tense: 3
  • First-person past tense: 10
  • Third-person past tense: 37
  • Prologues (or other introductory passage): 6

Audience/Target Market. In terms of clearly identifying target market, remember those moments when the teacher hands back the quiz and says we’ll be throwing out this score for everyone? A little less than half of queries did not state their target market. I can posit several reasons for this: foremost, that many writers/readers do not feel they need to note a difference between “fantasy” and “general adult fantasy.” There was also confusion between young adult and new adult, which is not surprising as new adult is scooping out territory that was formerly YA or adult on either side. And there’s no clear cut distinction. In young adult, the protagonist must be a teenager. However an 18 or 19 year-old protagonist can be young adult or new adult depending on what sort of problems they are facing, whether those problems are teen-problems or becoming-an-adult-problems. For example, eighteen-year-old Christina Sundy of Glamour has not yet gotten over high school in spite of the fact that she’s already graduated, putting her story squarely in young adult territory. However, it’s never accurate to say in a query this novel will suit both adult and young adult markets, because it won’t. Sure, adults read young adult books, and teens read adult books, but in each of these statements the former is an age group and the latter is a target market; a book can have only one target market. If multiple age groups read it — bravo! — but just because adults read Harry Potter does not make Harry Potter a general adult fantasy novel. Some of the following distinctions are what our editors decided the real market was; the numbers for unnamed, incorrect, etc. are as found in the query letters.

  • General Adult: 23
  • New Adult: 8
  • Young Adult: 17
  • Unnamed: 23
  • Blatantly mislabeled: 1
  • Incorrectly claimed multiple markets: 9

Responses. Personal responses from the editors range from a single sentence to multiple paragraphs depending on what our editors could succinctly say as to what intrigued and/or troubled them about a query and sample pages.

  • Requested full manuscripts: 8
  • Requested partial manuscripts: 3
  • Declined queries: 51
    • Declined queries that received personal responses: 17
    • Declined queries that received requests to submit future projects: 2
    • Re-write requests: 0
    • Authors who asked for feedback after receiving a form rejection: 2
    • Authors who refuted feedback provided in personalized responses: 1
  • Acceptances: 2
    • Both acceptances were anthology proposals (Corvidae and Scarecrow), all novel MSs are still under review

Percentages

  • Requested manuscripts: 17.2%
    • Partial: 4.7%
    • Full: 12.5%
  • Queries receiving personal responses: 26.6%
  • Queries of novels/novellas resulting in offers: … none yet.

Stats on Requested Manuscripts.

  • Author Gender
    • Male: 2
    • Female: 9
  • Speculative Fiction Sub-genre
    • Science Fiction: 1
    • Fantasy: 9
      • Primary-world fantasy (e.g. contemporary fantasy, alternate history, urban fantasy): 5
      • Second-world fantasy (e.g. high fantasy): 4
    • Science-Fantasy: 1
  • Form
    • Novel: 9
    • Novella: 2 (43,000 and 44,000 words)
  • Storytelling choices
    • First-person present tense: 1
    • Third-person present tense: 1
    • First-person past tense 2
    • Third-person past tense: 7
    • Prologue: 1
  • Audience / Target Market
    • General Adult: 6
    • New Adult: 2
    • Young Adult: 3

Trends. February 2014 was the month to submit ancient history based speculative fiction! Almost 8% of queries had to do with Ancient Rome, Ancient Greece, or Ancient Egypt (or were heavily influenced by those times / mythologies).

Query Fail. Stats on query letters gone wrong. While #QueryFail isn’t certain death for a submission should we see something worth pursuing, it does make it a whole lot harder to find that spark to pursue. We hold to the notion that a query letter should contain a “pitch” of the story (much like the paragraphs on the back cover of a paperback), some information about the story’s market (YA, NA, Adult, what sub-genre of speculative fiction, word count), and maybe one or two lines about the author. This, as per our guidelines should be followed by a 5,000-word writing sample (i.e. the opening of the manuscript). We lay everything out on on Submissions page, and for the most part, everyone sends us what we ask and avoids stuff that we don’t ask for.

  • Query letters that didn’t have a query/pitch: 2
  • Submissions with a synopsis following the letter (without a pitch): 3
  • Submissions with a synopsis in addition to the pitch: 2
  • Submissions that did not include a 5,000-word sample, or included the wrong type of sample: 4
  • Letters that referenced WWP’s “other horror titles” when we don’t publish horror: 1
  • Letters addressed “to whom it may concern” that claimed they’d been closely following us: 1
  • Letters addressed “dear sir” or “dear sir or madam”: 0 –  A huge step up from years past, here! We love you!

Our next open submission periods are June and September 2014. We also have several anthologies that will be accepting submissions in 2014. And as always, check back for new releases — the best way to get to know what a publisher is producing is to read the works they publish.

Two New Anthologies to Accept Submissions in Summer 2014

Starting July 1, 2014, Rhonda Parrish will be reading for Corvidae and Scarecrow, two new anthologies in the same series as Fae (forthcoming).  Like Fae (to be released June 2014) each of these new anthologies focuses on a single creature (we use the term loosely with “scarecrow”) treated in many varied and enthralling ways by new speculative fiction short stories.

The twin anthologies also present a unique opportunity: to create a conversation between the two volumes, between the crows and the scarecrows, between the bird tales of Corvidae and the straw-man tales of Scarecrow. And so would like some overlap between the authors included in each title. Thus we encourage writers to submit to both anthologies. Please do not submit the same story to both books (if the anthologist believes a story is more appropriate for one than the other she will let you know).

The reading period will be July 1-October 31, 2014 — hopefully allowing plenty of time to write new stories and pick up a copy of Fae.

Below is a basic description of both anthology calls. Details of payment, rights, submission method, etc., can be found on our Submissions / Calls for Anthologies page. Please remember that these anthologies are not open to submissions until July. We are posting this information early as a courtesy only.


Corvidae

Corvidae are the family of birds which include such iconic species as crows, ravens, magpies, rooks and nutcrackers. They are known for their high intelligence (they use tools and recognize themselves in mirrors!) and appear in fiction and mythology all through the ages and in a great many different cultures as well.

Corvids are seen as mystical creatures, known to be companions to both Odin and Apollo, believed by the Haida to have created the earth and credited (in the form of Raven the Trickster) for stealing fire and bringing it to earth, but they are also associated with death, disease and madness. According to legend, the Kingdom of England will fall if the ravens leave the Tower of London and so are a kind of good luck charm, but they are also associated with battle and war through their connection with The Morrigan and Badb from Irish mythology. Such paradoxical creatures, it’s easy to be fascinated by them, and a great many of us are.

We are looking for fantasy and well-written horror stories (nothing gratuitously gory or violent) of up to 7,500 words long. Edit: we will also consider science fiction and any story that contains speculative elements.

Scarecrow

Scarecrows have been portrayed as everything from empty-headed geniuses to malevolent demons. They’ve appeared in literature and mythology, from as far back as ancient Japan where Kuebiko, the god of agriculture is represented as a wise scarecrow who cannot walk, to more modern representations in Doctor Who. They are  supervillains and storybook heroes, hapless and powerful. Wonderfully paradoxical creatures, much like the birds they are (in their most practical forms) meant to scare away. It is no wonder they capture our imaginations the way they do. It’s time the world had an anthology filled with scarecrow stories.

I will be looking for fresh twists on these ancient characters, exotic locations (both real and imagined), three-dimensional characters, and engaging voices.

About the anthologist: Rhonda Parrish is driven by a desire to do All The Things. She has been the publisher and editor-in-chief of Niteblade Magazine for over five years now (which is like 25 years in internet time) and is the editor of the forthcoming World Weaver Press anthology Fae. In addition, Rhonda is a writer whose work has been included or is forthcoming in dozens of publications including Tesseracts 17: Speculating Canada from Coast to Coast and Mythic Delirium. Her website, updated weekly, is at rhondaparrish.com.

Glamour Cover Unveiling

Glamour cover art has arrived! This young adult urban fantasy by Andrea Janes is full of snark, wit, and of course, witches!

Glamour, a novel by Andrea Janes, World Weaver Press

Publication date: March 18, 2014.

Stealing the life she’s always wanted is as easy as casting a spell.

Townie. That’s what eighteen-year-old Christina Sundy is. All year round she lives in a one-stoplight town on Cape Cod, and when summer comes, she spends her days scooping ice cream for the rich tourists she hates. So when one of them takes a job in the ice cream shop alongside her, she’s pissed. Why does a blonde and perky Harvard-bound rich girl like Reese Manning want to scoop ice cream anyway?

Something else weird is happening to Christina: tiny blue sparks seem to be shooting off her fingers. It isn’t long before she realizes the truth about herself — she’s actually a powerful hereditary witch. But her newfound powers are too intense for her to handle and, in a moment of rage, she accidentally zaps Reese into another dimension.

So that no one will notice that the rich girl has disappeared, Christina casts a disguising spell, or “glamour,” and lives Reese’s life while she tries to find a retrieval spell.But as the retrieval spell proves harder than anticipated, and as she goes about living Reese’s life without anyone on the outside noticing the switch, Christina realizes that there’s nothing to stop her from making the glamour permanent… except, of course, her fellow witches, a 16th century demon, and, just maybe, her own conscience.

Add this book to your Goodreads to-read list!Add it to your Goodreads lists now!
And pick it up in paperback or ebook on March 18.

Enter the Goodreads giveaway and you could get a paperback ARC before you can buy it!

Far Orbit Cover Unveiling and Giveaway

Far Orbit: Speculative Space Adventures cover art has arrived! This anthology of modern space adventures crafted by a new generation of Grand Tradition science fiction writers is edited by Bascomb James and features the work of award winners Gregory Benford, Tracy Canfield, Eric Choi, David Wesley Hill and others, with a special letter to SF by Elizabeth Bear. Available April 29, 2014.

FAR ORBIT speculative space adventures

Cover art features the image of Cepheus B, shot by Chandra X-ray Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, used courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Publication date: April 29, 2014.

Modern space adventures crafted by a new generation of Grand Tradition science fiction writers. Smart, readable, and engaging stories that take us back to a time when science fiction was fun and informative, pithy and piquant—when speculative fiction transported us from the everyday grind and left us wondrously satisfied. Showcasing the breadth of Grand Tradition stories, from 1940s-style pulp to realistic hard SF, from noir and horror SF to spaceships, alien uplift, and action-adventure motifs, Far Orbit’s diversity of Grand Tradition stories makes it easy for every SF fan to find a favorite.

Featuring an open letter to SF by Elizabeth Bear and stories from Gregory Benford, Tracy Canfield, Eric Choi, Barbara Davies, Jakob Drud, Julie Frost, David Wesley Hill, K. G. Jewell, Sam Kepfield, Kat Otis, Jonathan Shipley, Wendy Sparrow, and Peter Wood.

“Daring adventure, protagonists who think on their feet, and out of this world excitement! Welcome to FAR ORBIT, a fine collection of stories in the best SF tradition. Strap in and enjoy!” – Julie E. Czerneda, author of SPECIES IMPERATIVE

“Successfully captures the kinds of stories that were the gateway drugs for many of us who have been reading science fiction for a long time. Well done!”—Tangent

Add this book to your Goodreads to-read list!Add Far Orbit to your Goodreads to-read list today!

Enter to win a paperback ARC by sharing this post! 

Tweet the unveiling, reblog this post on your own site, or share the link on social media. If you Tweet the cover unveiling and include the tag @WorldWeaver_wwp you’re automatically entered into the drawing; if you repost or share on other social media sites, leave a comment below that includes the link to your post and a way for us to contact you. Entry into the giveaway ends the night of February 28, 2014. Winner must have US, Canadian, or UK mailing address.

FAR ORBIT cover art

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