Category Archives: fairy tales and folklore

Fairy tales, folklore, Mexican myths and legends, and a young woman, about to graduate from college, confused about what to do with her life

Devil in Midwinter, Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver PressBy Elise Forier Edie.

I am so excited about the release of The Devil in Midwinter, my new paranormal romance novella, published by World Weaver Press.

It mashes up fairy tales, folklore, Mexican myths and legends with a contemporary story about a young woman, about to graduate from college, confused about what next to do with her life.

At it core it’s about a choice that many people must make at various times in their lives: Do I believe what my heart tells me, or do I believe the stories I’m told? Is the “right” choice the practical one, or the one that seems completely crazy? Do I dare believe that my wildest dreams can come true, or do I settle for the staid and safe path, taking the easiest road that is offered?

The book also has to do with the tricky business of being a powerful female. Throughout history, there has been a lot of pressure for women, young and old, to reject their power, subvert their intellect, or to use their considerable abilities to help a man appear more powerful and successful.

And believe it or not, that can actually be a very appealing choice. After all, using one’s power means exposing oneself to ridicule and suspicion. It can lead to mistakes and even ruin. It can make a young woman a laughingstock. And everyone knows a powerful woman might wind up alone, unloved and unfulfilled. Meanwhile, hiding one’s power, not speaking up, not fighting, is often the “nice” choice. And women are often expected to be “nice.”

In “The Devil in Midwinter” a young woman on the cusp of adulthood is given a choice—the dangerous path or the familiar road, the unknown or the known.

WHAT WOULD YOU DO:

If a monster chased you through an apple orchard?

If a handsome millionaire kept making delightful propositions you ached to accept?

If a beautiful, dark man you had dreamed about all your life suddenly appeared in the flesh and kissed you?

Which would you choose—a deal with the devil, or a possible catastrophe? Safe or out there? Love or money?

Write back and let me know. I’m always curious to see where our choices—brave or practical—can lead.

Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver PressElise Forier Edie is an author and playwright based in southern California. Recent works include the play “The Pink Unicorn,” which performed at the United Solo Theatre Festival in New York, a short story, “Leonora,” published in Penumbra magazine and several plays, included in the anthology “Original Middle School Scenes and Monologues,” edited by Kent R. Brown. She is a member of the Authors Guild, the Romance Writers of America (RWA) and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She is married to actor Keith Edie. When she is not writing, she likes to make quilts and soup, but rarely at the same time.

Out now! New Release: The Devil in Midwinter

WDevil in Midwinter, Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver Pressorld Weaver Press is pleased to announce The Devil in Midwinter by Elise Forier Edie, a new paranormal romance novella, and previously featured in A Winter’s Enchantment, is available in trade paperback and ebook today, Tuesday, April 8, 2014.

Praise for The Devil in Midwinter:

The Devil in Midwinter is a beautiful tapestry of myth and legend and love, woven into a small town romance.”
—Amalia Dillin, author of Forged by Fate

“A mash-up of Mexican folklore and the classic Sleeping Beauty, set in the orchards of Washington, The Devil In Midwinter is a stunning romance that put me in mind of the lush works of Charles De Lint.”
—Kristina Wojtaszek, author of Opal

A handsome stranger, a terrifying monster, a boy who burns and burns… Mattawa, Washington, is usually a sleepy orchard town come December, until a murder, sightings of a fantastic beast, and the arrival of a handsome new vintner in town kindle twenty-year-old reporter Esme Ulloa’s curiosity—and maybe her passion as well. But the more she untangles the mystery, the more the world Esme knows unspools, until she finds herself navigating a place she thought existed only in storybooks, where dreams come alive, monsters walk the earth and magic is real. When tragedy strikes close to home, Esme finds she must strike back, matching wits with an ancient demon in a deadly game, where everything she values stands to be lost, including the love of her life.

Read the digital edition exclusively from these retailers:
Amazon | All Romance | Barnes & Noble | Kobo

Read the trade paperback edition from these and other retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Books-A-Million| Independent Bookstores

Elise Forier Edie, World Weaver PressElise Forier Edie is an author and playwright based in southern California. Recent works include the play “The Pink Unicorn,” which performed at the United Solo Theatre Festival in New York, a short story, “Leonora,” published in Penumbra magazine and several plays, included in the anthology “Original Middle School Scenes and Monologues,” edited by Kent R. Brown. She is a member of the Authors Guild, the Romance Writers of America (RWA) and the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI). She is married to actor Keith Edie. When she is not writing, she likes to make quilts and soup, but rarely at the same time.

Last Minute Gift Giving Ideas

Books make great gifts: they’re easy to wrap, they show up on your doorstep in a few days, no assembly required, no impossible-to-open plastic clam shell. Add to that the fact that children who read for pleasure for 20+ minutes each day score higher on just about every test than those who don’t, and you really can’t go wrong. Here’s our suggestions for the readers on your list:

For the Young Reader

Heir to the Lamp, Michelle Lowery Combs, World Weaver PressHeir to the Lamp by Michelle Lowery Combs is a great read for ages 11+ (and a fast, fun read for adults who like YA books), the protagonist, Ginn, has waaay too many adopted siblings, is a starter on the school basketball team, and has a crush on the guy whose family just might be out to kidnap her and use her awesome new genie powers for dark purposes — oh, did we mention that Ginn just discovered she’s a genie? It’s a position that comes with an cool old lamp, the ability to wish things and have them happen, and a charming dark-haired guardian … who Ginn might have just wished into a flop-eared bunny. Oops.

Opal, Kristina Wojtaszek, World Weaver PressOpal by Kristina Wojtaszek is a lyrical and beautiful retwisting of the Snow White tale set in the world of Fae and men, ages 13+. At only about 100 pages long, this slim novella is a great gift idea for young readers (or not so young) who’ve enjoyed films like Snow White and the Huntsman or The Hobbit, or adult fans of Patricia McKillip and Robin McKinley. A young fae woman, born an owl and knowing no life but that of nests and wings and feathers, is forced back into human shape after her mother’s death. A human prince, driven from his home by the cruelty of his father, must make his way in the dark and twisty forest of the Fae. Told in two different voices, their tales intertwine in this beautiful tale.

For Mystery Readers

Haunted HousewivesIf they like Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum series (One for the Money, Takedown Twenty) they’ll love The Haunted Housewives of Allister, Alabama. A cozy mystery complete with zany extended family, paranormal hijinks, a haunted Velvet Elvis painting and all the crazies and kooks who’ll do anything to get it away from Cleo Tidwell. Now, Cleo was happy with her Southern suburban existence, and you’d think that getting rid of a tacky black velvet painting would be a good thing … except this particular painting might have just possessed her husband, and that’s something she’s determined to see set right! Who would have ever thought a well-raised baton twirling coach would end up in a highway car chase, investigating murders, and being kidnapped — with her mother-in-law, of all things?! (And don’t forget that the sequel, The Weredog Whisperer by Susan Abel Sullivan, is coming out after Christmas!)

For Readers Seeking Something Different

Shards of History, Rebecca Roland, World Weaver PressSay you’re looking for a gift for a reader who used to love high fantasy but got bored with it, or a New Adult fan, or someone who just loves great adventures: try Shards of History by Rebecca Roland. Still encompassing the noble ideals of second-world or high fantasy, but with the flavors of the Southwest, Shards of History’s strong female protagonist, Malia, must try to lead her people away from the path of certain destruction, fight the unknown enemy, and fix the very sky that’s shattered and falling in shards around them. Think Scott O’Dell meets Anne McCaffery’s Dragons of Pern. (Also suitable for teen readers. )

For Fans of Fairy Tales 

Beyond the Glass Slipper, Kate Wolford, World Weaver PressIf they love TV’s GRIMM or spend their time delving into the classic volumes of Andrew Lang, Charles Perrault, and Brother’s Grimm, then they’re going to love Beyond the Glass Slipper: Ten Neglected Fairy Tales To Fall In Love With. Not only does Beyond the Glass Slipper bring together ten slightly obscure fairy tales, editor Kate Wolford sets them up with introductions and notes in the margin to provide context and continuity in a lighthearted but enlightened way.

Wolves and Witches, Amanda C. Davis and Megan Engelhardt, World Weaver PressFairy Tale fans can also get behind the short story collection Wolves and Witches written by sisters Amanda C. Davis and Megan Engelhardt. A mix of short stories and poetry, all renditions of fairy tales, with a pleasing mix of darkness and humor. It’s amazing how well the sisters’ voices blend; while they don’t collaborate on individual tales, it’s often hard to tell one’s writing apart from the other’s! Great for book clubs.

If Mythology is their thing…

Forged by Fate, Fate of the Gods Trilogy, Amalia Dillin, World Weaver PressTry Forged by Fate by Amalia Dillin. A mix of Norse, Greek, and Egyptian mythology blends seamlessly with the Biblical Garden of Eden in this fantasy novel which stretches from Creation to Modern Day. After Adam fell, God made Eve to protect the World. The story follows Adam, Eve, Thor, and more. And continues in book two of the trilogy, Fate Forgotten.

Find out more about these and other World Weaver Press books.

New! For readers who love it all: romance, mythology + fairy tale fantasy

A Winter's Enchantment, Elise Forier Edie, Amalia Dillin, Kristina Wojtaszek, World Weaver PressThree novellas of winter magic and loves lost and regained, A Winter’s Enchantment features The Devil in Midwinter, a new modern-day mystery with a fantastical twist; Taming Fate, a never-before-read installment in the critically-acclaimed “Fate of the Gods” series; and Opal, the hauntingly beautiful retelling of Snow White previously released by World Weaver Press.

Rather give an ebook than a paperback, but aren’t sure how one can gift electrons? We’ve got an answer for that too. See our How to Gift an eBook guide!

Fae Anthology: Editor’s Update from the Slush Pile

domovoi,  a type of faeBy Rhonda Parrish.

Oh my.

Have you looked at the calendar lately? We’re getting awfully close to the November 30 deadline for Fae submissions which means it’s time for another update from the slush pile.

First of all, can I just say I am incredibly impressed with the submissions so far (even the ones I’ve passed on). For the most part the stories are great and, at the risk of jinxing myself, everyone has been following the submission guidelines! Okay, I shouldn’t totally geek out about that, but I am, because it’s so rare. So thank you to everyone who has submitted so far, I think you’re all amazing.

As for the stories themselves, while I’m still seeing a disproportionately high number of pieces set in forests in medieval Europe, a growing number of submitters seem to have really taken my advice to think outside the box and be specific to heart. I am encouraged by the growing number of pieces set in specific locales and with fairies which are a little different from the norm. Please keep that up. Some of the stories on my short list are of the more traditional fairy in a forest variety but I’m hoping to greatly outnumber them with other varieties. For example, one of my favourite submissions to date is one the author described as being ‘steampunk lite’ and another is an urban fantasy set in Indianapolis. So yes, please keep up the variety of settings and fairy types. I love it.

I am still missing a few elements that were on my wish list for this anthology, so if you’re stuck for an idea of what to write about, maybe take a look at the specific things I asked for in the guidelines. I haven’t got a tooth fairy story yet, for example, or the perfect arctic fairy, a silkie (selkie), imp, or any modern time-traveler types*. Those are all very sort of general descriptions but I bet they could make a great jumping off point to start something creative and awesome.

I’ve also received a fair number of “Does this story sound like something you’d like?” emails. And while I totally understand the inclination to write those, truthfully my answer is always, always, always going to be, “Send it and we’ll see”. I cannot judge how much I’m going to like a story or how good a fit it will be for the anthology based on your description. I need to read the actual piece. I know that can seem like a big step to take if you’re a beginning writer (and sometimes even if you’re not) but it really is the only way I can tell you how I feel about your story. So when in doubt, submit. J

If you’ve got any other specific questions feel free to leave them as a comment to this blog post or email me at fae[at]worldweaverpress.com . I’d love to hear from you and I’d especially love to read your fairy stories. Keep ‘em coming!

*It’s possible these types of stories are sitting in my inbox and I haven’t read them yet. The oldest unread submission I have right now is from October 21st.

About the anthologist: Rhonda Parrish is a master procrastinator and nap connoisseur but despite that she somehow manages a full professional life. She has been the publisher and editor-in-chief ofNiteblade Magazine for over five years now (which is like 25 years in internet time) and is the editor of the forthcoming benefit anthology, Metastasis. In addition, Rhonda is a writer whose work has been included or is forthcoming in dozens of publications including Tesseracts 17: Speculating Canada from Coast to Coast and Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing. Her website, updated weekly, is at http://www.rhondaparrish.com. More information about submitting to the Fae anthology can be found in our open calls for anthologies.

Update from the Slush Pile: Fae Anthology

Editor and Anthologist Rhonda Parrish gives us an update on the progress of the anthology Fae and some insights on what she hopes to see before the November 30, 2013 deadline:

We opened up to submissions for Fae at the beginning of the month, and now that stories have been coming in for a couple weeks, I thought we’d do a quick update blog to let you know how it’s going so far and what I’d like to see more of going forward.

I’ve received about 50 submissions so far which is enough for me to notice a few trends and, even more important, begin to get a feeling for what the shape of this anthology is going to look like. That makes me able to give a more detailed idea of what I’m looking for in submissions.

I want to see something new.
Each of the stories which I’ve placed on my short list offered me something I hadn’t seen before. I’m getting a lot of fairy tale retellings, and some of them are very well written, but they aren’t new or they aren’t new enough. (Note: This isn’t a “fairy tale” anthology, oh no — it’s stories about fairies, hobs, pixies, and their kin, not folktales per se)

If you’re going to send me a story I’ve heard before, you have to re-make it as something spectacular that only you could have created. Simply swapping the gender of a character or telling the story from the villain’s point of view isn’t going to be enough to win a spot in this anthology. If you can show me something I’ve never seen before, however, your chances of making the short list (and eventually the table of contents) are good.

I’d like to see more variety in story settings.
So far I’m seeing a lot of stories set in some sort of nebulous modern time setting (advanced technology such as cars and electricity exist but we’re never actually given enough detail to know exactly where or when the story is taking place) and even more set in some sort of nebulous middle ages setting (no running water, people using carts and horses but again, no idea where or precisely when the story is being set).

I want a setting I can really, if you’ll pardon the cliché, sink my teeth into, and I don’t want every story in this collection to share the same world, the same time, the same place. I’m looking for variety. If you submit a story set in 1880s Yellowknife I promise you it is going to stand out from the crowd more than if you submit a story set in Anycity, Anytime. I promise.

Gimme space fairies. Desert fairies. Jungle fairies. Arctic fairies. Make up your own world that’s completely unlike anyone else’s. Set the fairies in your own city and make sure I can tell what city that is. Make the setting matter.

Genre bending is fun.
I love straight fantasy and I’m happy to read straight fantasy fairy stories, and if they are well-written and have something new to offer I’ll be pleased to make a space for them on my short list but again, I’m looking for something new in these stories and one way to stand out from the crowd is to mix, bend or blend the genre you’re writing from.

Steampunk fairies. Time-travelling fairies. Killer fairies. Ghost fairies… Read the rest of this entry

FAE Anthology Open to Submissions

Sophie Gengembre Anderson (1823–1903) Take the fair face of WomanWe’ve been talking about it for weeks, but the time to submit your fairy short story has arrived! And remember we’re looking for many different incarnations of fairy — good fairies, evil fairies, tiny ones, human-sized ones, (see below for a much more interesting description of what we’re seeking). The anthology is meant for a readership of 16-and-up (adult fiction). This is not a children’s anthology. We will gladly consider fairy-based horror.

If we say it’s adult fiction then why “16-and-up”? It’s a completely arbitrary number based on the age some of us here at WWP were when we first read A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Fairies and Shakespeare, rock it!

If you’re not sure if your story is “fairy enough,” submit it anyway and let the editor decide. Please don’t query about the potential appropriateness of your story; when it comes to short fiction, it’s much more efficient to let us read the story than it is to try and describe it to us in a letter.

Have you ever noticed that, despite the name, there is often a conspicuous absence of fairies in fairy tales? Historically speaking fairies have been mischievous or malignant. They’ve dwelt in forests, collected teeth or crafted shoes. In Fae, we want stories that honor that rich history but explore new and interesting takes on fairies as well. We want urban fairies and arctic fairies, steampunk fairies, time-traveling and digital fairies. We want stories that bridge traditional and modern styles and while we’re at it, we want stories about fairy-like creatures too. Bring us your sprites, your pixies, your seelies and unseelies, silkies, goblins or gnomes, brownies and imps. We want them all. We’re looking for lush settings, beautiful prose and complex characters.

About the anthologist: Rhonda Parrish is a master procrastinator and nap connoisseur but despite that she somehow manages a full professional life. She has been the publisher and editor-in-chief of Niteblade Magazine for over five years now (which is like 25 years in internet time) and is the editor of the forthcoming benefit anthology, Metastasis. In addition, Rhonda is a writer whose work has been included or is forthcoming in dozens of publications includingTesseracts 17: Speculating Canada from Coast to Coast and Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing. Her website, updated weekly, is at rhondaparrish.com

Open submission period: September 1 – November 30, 2013. Seeking submissions of less than 7,500 words now!

For details, like how to submit, see our Calls for Anthologies. And while you’re there don’t forget to check out the details of our Krampus open call, also seeking submissions until November 30.

Where Are the Fairies of Fairy Tales?

SPIRIT OF THE NIGHT, 1879, by John Atkinson GrimshawHave you ever noticed that, despite the name, there is often a conspicuous absence of fairies in fairy tales? So begins the description of editor Rhonda Parrish’s newest project, Fae, an anthology of original fairy tales — no, not Snow White or Little Red Riding Hood, but the tales of fairies – with an open submission period starting on September 1 and closing November 30, 2013.  Keep an eye out for the release of this dazzling project in summer 2014.

Historically speaking fairies have been mischievous or malignant. They’ve dwelt in forests, collected teeth or crafted shoes. In Fae, we want stories that honor that rich history but explore new and interesting takes on fairies as well. We want urban fairies and arctic fairies, steampunk fairies, time-traveling and digital fairies. We want stories that bridge traditional and modern styles and while we’re at it, we want stories about fairy-like creatures too. Bring us your sprites, your pixies, your seelies and unseelies, silkies, goblins or gnomes, brownies and imps. We want them all. We’re looking for lush settings, beautiful prose and complex characters.

For more details about submitting to the anthology see our submission page, Calls for Anthologies. And while you’re there, check out the details of the Krampus anthology if your writing bent runs more toward devils than sprites.

About the anthologist: Rhonda Parrish is a master procrastinator and nap connoisseur but despite that she somehow manages a full professional life. She has been the publisher and editor-in-chief ofNiteblade Magazine for over five years now (which is like 25 years in internet time) and is the editor of the forthcoming benefit anthology, Metastasis. In addition, Rhonda is a writer whose work has been included or is forthcoming in dozens of publications including Tesseracts 17: Speculating Canada from Coast to Coast and Imaginarium: The Best Canadian Speculative Writing. Her website, updated weekly, is at http://www.rhondaparrish.com

Top image credit: SPIRIT OF THE NIGHT, (painting) 1879 by John Atkinson Grimshaw.

A ‘Beyond the Glass Slipper’ Enchanted Conversation Writing Contest

enchanted conversationOver at Enchanted Conversation: A Fairy Tale Magazine, Editor and Publisher Kate Wolford is holding a very special writing contest: the submissions must be inspired by one of the ten fairy tales found within her recent nonfiction collection Beyond the Glass Slipper: Ten Neglected Fairy Tales To Fall In Love With.

Kate Wolford writes: “Since Beyond the Glass Slipper was conceived, nearly a year ago, I’ve been hoping that the stories in the book would eventually inspire writers and poets. I thought long and hard about how to achieve that, and holding a contest seemed like the best way to accomplish the goal.” More…

While all the fairy tales themselves are available online from Project Gutenberg and the like, Beyond the Glass Slipper provides context for the tales, as well as research and questions posed by Wolford herself — not to mention suggested story prompts for “The Nixy,” “The Soldier and the Vampire,” “The Three Pennies,” “Fairy Gifts,” “The Loving Pair,” “The Dirty Shepherdess,” “Gifts of the Little People,” “The Blue Light,” “King Pig,” and “Kisa the Cat.”

Find out more about the contest and pick up your copy of Beyond the Glass Slipper in ebook or paperback:

Read the digital edition for $5.99 from these ebook retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo

Read the trade paperback for $9.95 from these and other retailers:
Amazon

Praise for Wolves and Witches

Wolves and Witches, Amanda C. Davis and Megan Engelhardt, World Weaver Press

Witches have stories too. So do mermaids, millers’ daughters, princes (charming or otherwise), even big bad wolves.

“Once I began to read this collection, I couldn’t stop. Just as with those secretive princesses with their silken slippers gone to shreds, I danced among these pages until dawn!”
—Terrie Leigh Relf, Illumen

Wolves and Witches is a fabulous collection of re-imagined fairy tales. I made the mistake of starting it late one evening and couldn’t go to sleep until I had read it all. With their dark prose and evocative poetry these sisters have done the Brothers Grimm proud.”
—Rhonda Parrish, Niteblade Fantasy and Horror Magazine

“Dark and delicious revenge-filled tales! I Highly Recommend this fun and small collection of short stories.”
Fangs, Wands & Fairy Dust.

“Davis and Engelhardt’s Wolves and Witches: A Fairy Tale Collection is a joy, start to finish. At times eloquent, at times written in a bare-bones style, this collection of verse and prose takes familiar fairy tales and turns them into something darker, deeper, and delicious. My very heart was stolen by a cobbler with a bad leg. That’s good storytelling.”
—Mercedes M. Yardley, Author of Beautiful Sorrows

“Sisters Amanda C. Davis and Megan Engelhardt are the female Brothers Grimm.”
—K. Allen Wood, Shock Totem

“In their collection of re-envisioned fairy tales, Wolves and Witches, Amanda C. Davis and Megan Engelhardt deliver an assortment of poetry and short fiction that entertains the ear and tickles the mind. The prose is assured, clever, and insightful, and the stories, which often experiment with perspective, dance from the page.”
—Stephen Ramey, author of Glass Animals, and editor for the Triangulation anthology series from Parsec Ink

“It’s in the details that Davis and Engelhardt get you. I don’t know if it’s love or obsession or maybe just succumbing to the spell, but what stays with me is the tenor and texture of these tales retold — whether the fabric of a dancing shoe, the hollowness of bones in the wind, or the sharp critique of stereotyped social norms. Let yourself be enchanted and enjoy.”
—Dan Campbell, Bull Spec

___

Read the digital edition for only $4.49 from these ebook retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | Kobo | OmniLit

Read the trade paperback edition for $7.95 from these and other online retailers:
Amazon

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